Heartworm Disease In Dogs and Cats

You may also like...

22 Responses

  1. raisingdaisy says:

    Wow, that’s really scary. I remember reading about heartworm when I got my first dog years ago, and it grossed me out so much that I’ve never forgotten to give any of our dogs their meds through the years. I doubt if there’s anyone living anywhere who doesn’t have to worry about mosquitoes during some portion of the year.

  2. That’s great that you are making sure that your dogs get a heartworm preventative every month, RaisingDaisy!

  3. It makes me crazy when people don’t give heartworm preventative to their pets. Living in Louisiana a.k.a. Mosquito Central, it is imperative that dogs and cats are guarded against heartworms. Most dogs have to be treated when they are brought into our local humane society. It is can be expensive, but to not treat them can cost much more, including their life.

  4. Thanks for sharing, M.K.!

  5. chasingdogtales says:

    The dog vs. cat comparison is interesting. I think I’ve heard that there’s a chance that dogs can still contract heartworms, even if they’re on a monthly preventative. If that’s true, how often or likely would that happen? I’ve always been curious why annual heartworm testing is needed if you give the monthly preventative.

  6. Thanks for your question, ChasingDogTales. Annual heartworm testing is recommended even if you are giving a monthly heartworm preventative because, although heartworm preventatives are very effective, no medication is 100% effective and there is still a chance that pets can become infected. In addition, missing a dose of a monthly preventative or giving it late can result in your pet becoming susceptible to heartworm infection. Even if you faithfully give the heartworm preventative every month as recommended, your pet may spit out or vomit an oral heartworm preventative resulting in one or more missed doses.

  7. Val Silver says:

    Important information here about heartworm. I like the charts – makes it easy to read and learn about heartworm in dogs and cats. Now, the photo – it amazes me that those worms could be that big inside a heart. Gross.

  8. I agree that seeing live heartworms in a dead dog’s heart is gross, Val. I watched a video of live heartworms moving around in a dead dog’s heart and that was even more disgusting. However, seeing what heartworms look like is an important part of learning about heartworm disease.

  9. Very informative. Do you mind if I share this with my Chihuahua group/followers? We are South Suburban Chihuahua. WOOF!

  10. Thanks, Piranha Banana. You are welcome to share a link to my post about Heartworm Disease with your Chihuahua group. I would love to have them visit my blog.

  11. Great article and very informative!! Question, is there an oral one that repels mosquitos, fleas and ticks. I’ve been using BioSpot with great results for years but hate the greasy mess of it.

  12. Thanks, Cathy! I am not aware of an oral product that kills heartworms, fleas, ticks, and mosquitos. Trifexis and Sentinel are given orally and are both are labeled to kill heartworms and fleas. Nexgard is an oral product that protects against fleas and ticks.

  13. travelanimaldr says:

    Great table on different heartworm preventatives. Thanks for another great article.

  14. Thanks, TravelAnimalDr!

  15. So scary, great post!

  16. Thanks, Talent Hounds!

  17. This is such a no brainer to me! I can’t imagine not giving Harley or Jax everything they need to protect themselves. It’s so cruel. Great post Rachele, will definitely share this one. The table was excellent also.

  18. Thanks, Groovy Goldendoodles!

  19. Thank you for this great post on such a deadly disease. My gang is on year round protection.

  20. That’s great to hear, Sand Spring Chesapeakes!

  21. Are you aware of heartworm incidence maps for other parts of the world? We’ll be sailing in the Caribbean with our golden and I wonder how much more we might need to worry about heartworm there.

  22. Hi SomethingWagging. I am not aware of heartworm incidence maps for other parts of the world. The heartworm incidence maps referred to in my post are generated from heartworm tests performed by a large diagnostics laboratory in the United States. I would recommend that you check with diagnostic laboratories or local veterinary medical associations in the countries nearest to where you will be sailing in the Caribbean for information about the incidence of heartworm disease in their countries.